Ashon Crawley headshot
AC

Ashon Thomas Crawley

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Religious Studies
Office location and address
Education
Ph.D., Duke University, 2013
MTS., Emory University, 2007
B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 2003
Biography

Ashon Crawley is Associate Professor of  Religious Studies and African American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. Professor Crawley works in the areas of black studies, queer theory, sound studies, theology, continental philosophy, and performance studies. His first book project, Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility (Fordham University Press) investigates alternative modes of sociality present in the aesthetics practices of Black Pentecostalism. His second book, The Lonely Letters (Duke University Press), explores the relationships between blackness, quantum mechanics, mysticism, and love. He is currently at work on two books about the Hammond B3 organ, the Black Church and sexuality.

Made Instrument
Source: Yale Center for Faith and Culture
August 01, 2018 – May 31, 2019
The Joy of Being Made Instrument
Source: Yale Center for Faith and Culture
May 30, 2018 – December 31, 2018
AAS 1020: Introduction to African-American and African Studies II
Credits: 4
This introductory course builds upon the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean surveyed in AAS 1010. Drawing on disciplines such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Political Science and Sociology, the course focuses on the period from the late 19th century to the present and is comparative in perspective. It examines the links and disjunctions between communities of African descent in the United States and in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The course begins with an overview of AAS, its history, assumptions, boundaries, and topics of inquiry, and then proceeds to focus on a number of inter-related themes: patterns of cultural experience; community formation; comparative racial classification; language and society; family and kinship; religion; social and political movements; arts and aesthetics; and archaeology of the African Diaspora.
RELG 3405: Introduction to Black and Womanist Religious Thought
Credits: 3
Is thought always already racialized, gendered, sexed? This Introduction to Black and Womanist Thought course argues that thought does not have to submit itself to modern regimes of knowledge production, that there are alternative ways to think and practice and be in the world with one another. An introduction to major thinkers in both religious thought and traditions with attention to theology, philosophy, and history.
AAS 3500: Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies
Credits: 3
Reading, class discussion, and written assignments on a special topic in African-American and African Studies Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.
AAS 3559: New Course in African and African American Studies
Credits: 3
New course in the subject of African and African American Studies.
RELG 3559: New Course in Religious Studies
Credits: 3
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
AAS 4570: Advanced Research Seminar in African-American & African Studies
Credits: 3
Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.
AAS 4993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Allows students to work on an individual research project. Students must propose a topic to an appropriate faculty member, submit a written proposal for approval, prepare an extensive annotated bibliography on relevant readings comparable to the reading list of a regular upper-level course, and complete a research paper of at least 20 pages.
RELG 5193: Religion and the Power of Sound
Credits: 3
This course gives particular attention to music and sounds that are created or used by various religious communities, and we discuss the ways sounds are imagined and experienced by audiences, congregations, & gatherings. We also explore sound itself, instrumentation, and noise. We investigate uses of ambient sound and silence. We listen and respond to voices. We ask what does the production of sound mean for the practice of religious community?
RELG 5195: Blackness and Mysticism
Credits: 3
This course considers the radicalism internal to a European Mystical Tradition but also its delimitation, particularly with how it gets cognized in western thought. We will then investigate a Black Radical Mystical Tradition that cannot be, as Robinson might say, "understood within the particular context of it genesis." It is a lived and living tradition, a tradition against religion, a tradition against western thought and modern Man.
RELG 5559: New Course in Religion
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of general religion.
RELG 8754: Tutorial: Black Feminism and Abolition
Credits: 3
Readings in the tradition of black feminist thought with a particular focus on the history of abolition as a philosophical, theological and spiritual practice.