Alex Johnson headshot
AJ

Alex M. Johnson

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB356
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. University of California at Los Angeles School of Law 1978
B.A. Claremont Men's College 1975
Biography

Alex M. Johnson, Jr. returned to the Law School in 2007 as the Perre Bowen Professor of Law after serving as dean and William S. Pattee Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota Law School. Before joining the Minnesota faculty in 2002 he served seven years as the vice provost for faculty recruitment and retention at the University of Virginia and was Mary and Daniel Loughran Professor of Law.

Johnson's teaching areas include property, modern real estate transactions, trusts and estates, and critical race theory. He served as the Harrison Foundation Research Professor of Law from 1992-95. Johnson's current research interests include critical race theory, examining the social construction of race and ethnicity and its impact on law and legal issues, and the application of relational contract theories to interests in real property.

Immediately after law school, Johnson spent two years in private practice with Latham & Watkins in Los Angeles. He then taught for two years at the University of Minnesota Law School, before returning to his law firm for another two years. In 1984, Johnson joined the Virginia law faculty. He has been a visiting professor at Stanford University, the University of Texas and Washington University law schools. He has lectured widely on academic standards, critical race theory and the efficacy of the LSAT and has appeared on numerous scholarly panels that address race as it relates to legal education.

Johnson has served as chair of the Board of Trustees of the Law School Admissions Council, the nonprofit corporation owned by ABA-approved law schools that produces and administers the LSAT, as well as the LSAC's Test, Development and Research, and Minority Affairs Standing Committees. Johnson has chaired several standing committees of the Association of American Law Schools, including Curriculum and New Scholarly Papers, and served on several AALS committees, including the Committee on Second Generation Diversity Issues. He has also served on and chaired several ABA law school site inspection teams as well as serving on several ABA standing and ad hoc committees. Johnson is currently the president of the executive committee of the Order of the Coif and is a member of the Academic Advisory Council for the Bill of Rights Institute. Johnson is a member of the American Law Institute and the American College of Real Estate Lawyers.

LAW 6002: Contracts
Credits: 4
This course examines the legal obligations that attach to promises made in a business contract or otherwise, including the remedies that may be available for promises that are not kept. The course examines the legal requirements for enforceable contracts, including consideration, consent and conditions, and the effect of fraud, mistake, unconscionability, and impossibility.
LAW 6006: Property
Credits: 4
The course is a general introduction to property concepts and different types of property interests, particularly real property. The course surveys present and future estates in land, ownership and concurrent ownership. Leasehold interests, gifts and bequests, covenants and servitudes, conveyancing, various land use restrictions, eminent domain, and intellectual and personal property issues are also considered.
LAW 7105: Modern Real Estate
Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the basic components of the residential real estate transaction with an emphasis on the listing agreement, the contract of sale, deeds of conveyance, title assurance (public and private), real estate finance, foreclosure and deficiency judgments.
LAW 8018: Trusts and Estates
Credits: 3–4
The course will cover intestate succession; requirements for the execution, revocation, republication, and revival of wills and codicils; probate procedure and grounds for will contests; requisites for the creation and termination of private trusts; inter vivos transactions that serve as will substitutes; planning for incapacity; and problems in the interpretation of wills.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member