Anne Coughlin headshot
AC

Anne M. Coughlin

Professor
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB387
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. New York University School of Law 1984
M.A. Columbia University 1979
B.A. Tufts University 1978
Biography

Anne M. Coughlin is the Lewis F. Powell, Jr., Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. She taught at Vanderbilt Law School from 1991-95, and she joined the University of Virginia faculty in 1996 after visiting during the 1995-96 academic year. Her primary research and teaching interests are in the areas of criminal law, criminal procedure, feminist jurisprudence and law and humanities. She is co-author of a casebook on criminal law, and she has written a number of articles exploring the intersections among criminal law, criminal procedure and feminist theory, as well as essays concerning the connections between law and literature.

In 1999, Coughlin received an All-University Teaching Award, one of the University's highest honors for excellence in teaching, research and service. She is co-chair of the National Association of Women Lawyers Supreme Court Evaluation Committee and of its Amicus Committee. Coughlin received her J.D. from New York University School of Law. At NYU Law School, Coughlin won numerous awards, and she served as managing editor for the New York University Law Review. After graduation, she clerked for Judge Jon O. Newman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr.

LAW 6003: Criminal Law
Credits: 3
This course explores the basic principles of Anglo-American criminal law, including the constituent elements of criminal offenses, the necessary predicates for criminal liability, the major concepts of justification and excuse, and the conditions under which offenders can be liable for attempt. Major emphasis is placed on the structure and interpretation of modern penal codes.
LAW 7019: Criminal Investigation
Credits: 3
This course examines the constitutional jurisprudence that regulates the government's investigation of crime and apprehension of criminal suspects. In particular, the course will focus on the doctrines by which the judiciary polices the police, including the primary remedy (suppression of evidence) for police misconduct.
LAW 7178: Feminist Jurisprudence
Credits: 3
Feminist jurisprudence is a field in which scholarly activity is rooted in a set of practices designed to excavate and revise the myriad ways in which law conditions the lived experiences of women, men, and children. In the course, we will study what are understood to be distinct schools of feminist jurisprudence and the forms of practice that each supports.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8816: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8817: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8818: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8819: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 3
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9089: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
This is the first semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9090: Seminar in Ethical Values (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester of a yearlong seminar designed to enhance students' understanding of ethical issues and address the broader ethical and moral responsibilities of the lawyer as citizen and leader.
LAW 9112: Trials of the Century:Literary & Legl Represntatns of Great Criminal Trials
Credits: 3
This seminar examines a number of famous criminal trials and explores what commonalities, if any, are shared by those trials that capture our cultural imagination. The focus is on rhetorical and narrative strategies for representing the facts, as well as the legal rules, adversarial norms, and ideological stakes in such trials.
LAW 9228: Advanced Topics in Law and Public Service (YR)
This is the first semester in a seminar intended to allow Fellows in the Law & Public Service Program to share research and writing on public-interest topics. Prerequisite: 3rd-Year Law
LAW 9229: Advanced Topics in Law and Public Service (YR)
Credits: 1
This is the second semester in a seminar intended to allow Fellows in the Law & Public Service Program to share research and writing on public-interest topics.
LAW 9291: Feminism in Practice
Credits: 3
The seminar will focus on the ways in which feminist legal theory is derived from and embodied in feminist practices. Readings will include historical texts, legal judgments, and literary works. Students will write short papers responding to the readings, and we will work as a group and in teams to identify new practical applications to support the movement for equal justice for women and men.
LAW 9311: Advanced Issues in Criminal Justice
Credits: 3
This seminar will explore current issues in criminal justice.
LAW 9999: Dissertation Research
Credits: 15
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.