Andres Clarens headshot
AC

Andres F. Clarens

Professor
Unit: School of Engineering and Applied Science
Department: Department of Systems and Information Engineering
Office location and address
151 Engineer's Way
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.S. ​University of Virginia, 1999
M.S. ​University of Michigan, 2004
Ph.D. ​University of Michigan, 2008
Biography

Andres Clarens is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Virginia and the Director of the Virginia Environmentally Sustainable Technologies Laboratory. His research is focused broadly on anthropogenic carbon flows and the ways that CO2 is manipulated, reused, and sequestered in engineered systems. The results of his work are important for developing efficient strategies for mitigating the emissions that are driving climate change. At the largest scales, his system-level modeling work has explored the life cycle of systems in the manufacturing, transportation, and energy sectors. In the laboratory, he is pursuing complementary research in the phase behavior and surface chemistry of carbon dioxide mixtures at high pressure.

The results from this work can be used to provide better lubricants for wind turbines and more accurate assessment of geologic carbon sequestration sites. In the classroom, Prof. Clarens engages in peer-to-peer learning at both the undergraduate and graduate level with an emphasis on developing innovative tools for teaching the fundamentals of climate change. In his spare time, he enjoys running, backpacking, fly-fishing, and traveling. He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Virginia, and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from the University of Michigan.

Modeling the path toward decarbonization in heavy industry
Source: Sloan Foundation
January 01, 2021 – December 31, 2023
Characterizing the reactivity and industrial ecology of pseudowollastonite to enable highperformance building materials from waste streams
Source: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
July 01, 2018 – June 30, 2022
Reinventing CEMENT: Carbonation-Enabled Mineralization to Engender Novel Technology
Source: U.S. Department of Energy
August 09, 2019 – August 08, 2021
EN-SE CAREER: Understanding the Physiocochemical and Systems-Level Processes that Would Enable Sustainable CO2 Sequestration in Shales
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Engineering
June 01, 2013 – September 30, 2019
EN-SE Targeted Mineral Carbonation to enhance wellbore integrity
Source: U.S. Department of Energy
October 01, 2015 – June 30, 2019
EN-CE 2015_NIST_SURF-01 for Shiu, Young
Source: U.S. Department Of Commerce
May 01, 2015 – September 30, 2015
EN-CE 2015_NIST_SURF-01 for Shiu/Young
Source: U.S. Department Of Commerce
May 01, 2015 – September 30, 2015
EN-CE 2015_NIST_SURF-01 for Shiu/Young
Source: U.S. DOC - Natl. Institute Standards & Tech. (NIST
May 01, 2015 – September 30, 2015
IDR: Collaborative Research: A Partnership for Multiscale Experimental Study of CO2 Leakage
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Engineering
October 01, 2011 – September 30, 2015
RS-2012 i6 Challenge - Virginia Innovation Partnership (VIP)
Source: U.S. DOC - Economic Development Administration
October 01, 2012 – March 31, 2015
Gas Expanded Lubricants: Smart Fluids for Improving Efficiency of Wind Turbines
Source: U.S. NSF - Directorate For Engineering
June 01, 2010 – December 31, 2014
Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Pavement Management Systems
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Epa)
August 16, 2011 – December 31, 2013
Systems Analysis for the Bio-Jet Fuel Industry in Virginia
Source: Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation & Re
November 01, 2012 – August 31, 2013
Gas Expanded Lubricants - Improving Energy Efficiency Using 'Smart' Fluids
Source: American Chemical Society
September 01, 2010 – August 31, 2013
CE 3050: Introduction to Green Engineering
Credits: 3
A hands-on overview in systems thinking as it relates to infrastructure and sustainability analysis. Students will learn quantitative tools to analyze complex socio-technical systems with a focus on water, energy, transportation, buildings, and food. Students will undertake an open-ended, team-based life cycle assessment project on a topic of their choice. Prerequisites: College Chemistry, and CE 2100 or Energy/Mass Balances.
SYS 4053: Systems Design I
Credits: 3
A design project extending throughout the fall semester. Involves the study of an actual open-ended situation, including problem formulation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, model building for the purpose of evaluating design options, model analysis, and generation of solutions. Includes an appropriate computer laboratory experience. Prerequisite: SYS 3021, 3060, and fourth-year standing in the Systems Engineering major.
SYS 4054: Systems Design II
Credits: 3
A design project extending throughout the spring semester. Involves the study of an actual open-ended situation, including problem formulation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, model building for the purpose of evaluating design options, model analysis, and generation of solutions. Includes an appropriate computer laboratory experience. Prerequisite: SYS 4053.
CE 4100: Water Chemistry
Credits: 3
This course covers the basic principles of aquatic chemistry as applied to problems in natural and engineered waters. Four specific reaction types will be covered including 1) acid-base, 2) precipitation-dissolution, 3) complexation, and 4) oxidation-reduction. Problem solving skills will be developed using graphical and analytical techniques. Taught concurrently with CE 6220
CE 4500: Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Credits: 1–3
Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing and instructor permission.
CE 4990: Civil Engineering Research and Design
Credits: 3
Team-based project course focusing on design or research effort with focus in a CEsub-discipline. Involves the study of an open-ended project, including problem formulation, development of methodology, data collection from physical experiments and/or models, analysis and interpretation, and formulation of conclusions/solutions. Requisites: 4th Year Standing Civil Majors and Assignment by CEE dept.
CE 4995: Civil Engineering Research
Credits: 1–4
Study of a civil engineering problem in depth by each student using library, computer, or laboratory facilities. The project is conducted in close consultation with departmental faculty and involves survey, analysis, or project development. Progress reports and a comprehensive written report are required. May be repeated if necessary. Prerequisite: Contact individual professor for Instructor Permission.
EVGE 5559: New Course in Geosciences
Credits: 1–4
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of geosciences.
CE 6030: Green Engineering and Sustainability
Credits: 3
An introductory to sustainability metrics and the engineering tools of industrial ecology, most notably life cycle assessment (LCA). Case studies from various engineering disciplines will be explored. Students will undertake an open-ended LCA project related to their thesis research or improving the sustainability of UVA operations. Asynchronous online format: roughly 8-10 h/wk. Prerequisite: SEAS 4th-year or Grad standing.
CE 6220: Water Chemistry
Credits: 3
This course covers the basic principles of aquatic chemistry as applied to problems in natural and engineered waters. Four specific reaction types will be covered including 1) acid-base, 2) precipitation-dissolution, 3) complexation, and 4) oxidation-reduction. Problem solving skills will be developed using graphical and analytical techniques. Students will also develop computer simulation skills. Taught concurrently with CE 4100
CE 6500: Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Credits: 3
Detailed study of special topics in civil engineering. Master's-level graduate students. Prerequisites: to be listed for each section as needed
CE 6993: Independent Study
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Master's-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 6995: Supervised Project Research
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Master's-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 7500: Special Topics in Civil Engineering
Credits: 1–12
Detailed study of special topics in civil engineering. Doctoral-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 7993: Independent Research in CE
Credits: 1–12
Detailed independent study of graduate course material under the guidance of a faculty member. Doctoral-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 8001: Graduate Teaching Instruction
Credits: 1–12
For graduate students who will be GTA for a course taught by CE faculty who have granted Instructor Permission for that section. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 8999: Thesis
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 9999: Dissertation
Credits: 1–12
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission

United States Fulbright Fellow – National Technical University of Argentina 2016

National Academies of Science, Arab American Frontiers of Science, Engineering and Medicine - Participant 2014

National Science Foundation CAREER Award 2013-2018

Department Teaching Award – UVa Civil and Environmental Engineering 2013

American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund Young Investigator Award 2010-2012

Fund for Excellence in Science and Technology – UVa Vice President for Research Office Junior Faculty Award (w/ L. Colosi) 2010-2011