Ali Güler headshot
AG

Ali Deniz Guler

Associate Professor
Unit: College of Arts and Sciences
Department: Department of Biology
Office location and address
414 PLSB
90 Geldard Driv
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
B.A., Bowdoin College, 1999
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 2006
Postdoctoral, Johns Hopkins University, 2006-2008
Postdoctoral, University of Washington, 2008-2013
AS-BIOL Regulation of central circadian rhythms by dopamine
Source: U.S. NIH Institute of General Medical Science
September 01, 2016 – August 31, 2021
AS-BIOL Next Generation Magnetogenetic Tools for Manipulating Cellular Activity
Source: Brain Research Foundation
June 01, 2016 – May 31, 2018
BIOL 3010: Genetics and Molecular Biology
Credits: 3
What makes humans different from fruit flies? Why does your brain have neurons and not liver cells? This course is all about the answer to these questions: It's the genes! This course covers the chemical make-up of genes, how they're passed on through generations, how they're expressed and how that expression is regulated, how disruption in the structure and expression of genes arise and how those disruptions lead to cellular defects and disease. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and either CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1810 or CHEM 1610. BIOL 3010 is not repeatable.
NESC 3960: Research in Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Students in Neuroscience major are expected to participate in active research, supervised by a faculty research mentor. The course grade is based on 10 hours/week lab work toward achieving term goals that are determined individually at the beginning of the term. Students are expected to submit a Term Plan one month after the first day of classes and a Progress Report two weeks before the last day of classes.
BIOL 4365: How to Map a Brain
Credits: 1
If you want to understand how our brain works, this is the course for you! In this student-driven Journal Club-style seminar series, we will consider recent neuroscience literature for discussion of the most innovative discoveries. A broad range of outstanding neuroscience issues will be considered; topics could include, for example, strategies for gene therapy for human neurological diseases, or the remote control of learning and memory. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
BIOL 4660: How do they do it? Method and Logic in Biomedical Science
Credits: 3
How has a bioluminescent jellyfish saved lives? What does a Himalayan pond fish have to do with research into the origins of psychiatric disorders? Innovative methods in biomedical research have played a significant part in the development of revolutionary disease cures, treatments and diagnostics. This course will examine many of these technical approaches and how they have led to such significant discoveries in basic biomedical research. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010
BIOL 4920: Independent Research in Biology
Credits: 2
Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member within the Biology Department. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
NESC 4970: Distinguished Majors Thesis
Credits: 3
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. The thesis must be based on empirical research conducted by the student. Prerequisite: Participant in Neuroscience DMP.
COGS 4970: Distinguished Major Thesis
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings.
COGS 4980: Distinguished Major Thesis
Credits: 6
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings.
NESC 4980: Distinguished Majors Thesis
Credits: 3
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Neuroscience Graduate Program faculty member. The thesis must be based on empirical research conducted by the student. Prerequisite: Participant in Neuroscience DMP.
BIOL 7660: How do they do it? Method and Logic in Cutting-edge Biomedical Science
Credits: 3
Do you know how a bioluminescent jellyfish protein is saving lives? The green fluorescent protein, earning its discoverers the 2008 Nobel Prize, is only one example of the recent biomedical breakthroughs leading to revolutionary diagnostics, treatments and cures that we will cover. Topics will range from how scientists are using roundworms to cure diabetes to why a pond fish from Himalayas might unlock the mysteries of psychiatric disorders.
NESC 9012: Methods in Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Neuroscience
Credits: 2
This course will provide the strong methodological foundation in molecular neuroscience. It will allow students to follow scientific lectures/seminars with ease while critically assessing discussed principles. Upon completion of this course, students will understand molecular and genetic methods used in assessing neuronal functions. This course will be a combination of lecture and discussion of classic and contemporary literature.
NESC 9998: Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
NESC 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral research, under the supervision of a dissertation director.
BIOL 9999: Non-Topical Research
Credits: 1–12
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.