Ashley Deeks headshot
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Ashley Deeks

Professor
Senior Fellow
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB373
Washington, District of Columbia 20001
Education
J.D. University of Chicago Law School 1998
B.A. Williams College 1993
Biography

Ashley Deeks joined the Law School in 2012 as an associate professor of law after two years as an academic fellow at Columbia Law School. Her primary research and teaching interests are in the areas of international law, national security, intelligence, and the laws of war. She has written a number of articles on the use of force, the intersection of national security and international law, and the laws of war. She is a member of the State Department's Advisory Committee on International Law and serves as a senior contributor to the Lawfare blog. Deeks also serves on the editorial board for the Journal of National Security Law and Policy, and is a senior fellow at the Lieber Institute for Law and Land Warfare.

Before joining Columbia in 2010, she served as the assistant legal adviser for political-military affairs in the U.S. State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser, where she worked on issues related to the law of armed conflict, the use of force, conventional weapons, and the legal framework for the conflict with al-Qaida. She also provided advice on intelligence issues. In previous positions at the State Department, Deeks advised on international law enforcement, extradition and diplomatic property questions. In 2005, she served as the embassy legal adviser at the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, during Iraq’s constitutional negotiations. Deeks was a 2007-08 Council on Foreign Relations international affairs fellow and a visiting fellow in residence at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Deeks received her J.D. with honors from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was elected to the Order of the Coif and served as comment editor on the Law Review. After graduation, she clerked for Judge Edward R. Becker of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

LAW 6107: International Law
Credits: 3–4
This is the introductory course in public (government-to-government) international law.  Topics include the International Court of Justice, the United Nations, recognition and statehood, diplomatic immunity, sovereign immunity, the law of the sea, torture, the Geneva and Hague Conventions, treaties, the European Union, and the World Trade Organization. 
LAW 7067: National Security Law
Credits: 3
Following the 9/11 attack, one of the fastest growing areas of legal inquiry has been national security law. This course is a comprehensive introduction, blending relevant international and national law.
LAW 7716: Current Issues in the Laws of War (SC)
Credits: 1
The laws of war seek to reconcile the realities of armed conflict with humanitarian concerns for people affected by those conflicts. Though these laws have deep historical roots, the complexities of modern conflicts and quickly-shifting technologies make the rules both increasingly relevant and increasingly challenging to apply.
LAW 8804: FT Externship: Directed Study
Credits: 3
This directed study is one part of a two-part full-time externship combining academic study and work experience under the supervision of a faculty member and an educational, charitable, governmental or nonprofit host organization.
LAW 8811: Independent Research
Credits: 1
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 9182: International Law and the Use of Force
Credits: 3
This seminar will examine the extent to which international law successfully regulates the use of force in the international community. We will focus on the prohibition on the use of force found in the U.N. Charter, and the exceptions to that prohibition.
LAW 9266: Government Secrecy
Credits: 3
This seminar will explore the ways in which each branch of government keeps secrets and whether structural and statutorily-created tools to check secret actions have proven effective.
LAW 9999: Dissertation Research
Credits: 15
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.