Aditya Bamzai headshot
AB

Aditya Bamzai

Associate Professor of Law
Unit: School of Law
Department: School of Law
Office location and address
WB302G
580 Massie Rd
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
Education
J.D. University of Chicago Law School 2004
B.A. Yale University 2000
Biography

Aditya Bamzai’s primary teaching and research interests are in the fields of civil procedure, administrative law, federal courts, national security law and computer crime. He joined the University of Virginia School of Law’s faculty as an associate professor in June 2016. His work has been published or is forthcoming in the Yale Law Journal, the University of Chicago Law Review, the George Washington University Law Review and the Missouri Law Review, among other journals.

Before entering the academy, Bamzai served as an attorney-adviser in the Office of Legal Counsel of the U.S. Department of Justice, and as an appellate attorney in both private practice and for the National Security Division of the Department of Justice. In the latter capacity, he argued a number of cases relating to national security and the separation of powers before the federal courts of appeals, including the third reported case decided by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review in its four-decade history. Earlier in his career, he served as a law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia of the United States Supreme Court and to Judge Jeffrey Sutton of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. He is a graduate of Yale University and of the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the editor-in-chief of the law review.

LAW 6000: Civil Procedure
Credits: 4
This course covers the procedures courts use in deciding lawsuits that do not involve criminal misconduct. Much of it is concerned with the process of litigation in trial courts, from the initial documents called pleadings, through the pre-trial process, especially the process of discovery in which parties obtain information from one another, to trial itself.
LAW 6102: Administrative Law
Credits: 3–4
This course covers the role of agencies in the constitutional structure and their operations. Topics include the nondelegation doctrine, executive appointment and removal power, the legislative veto as well as the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) and other sources of law that regulate and structure the authority of agencies to determine the rights and responsibilities of the public. Prerequisite: LAW 6001-Constitutional Law
LAW 7160: Computer Crime
Credits: 3
This lecture course will address the rapidly-changing field of computer crime and data privacy, surveying the major domestic authorities in the area, such as the Wiretap Act, the Pen/Trap statute, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the Stored Communications Act, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and the Fourth Amendment, as applied to computers.
LAW 8810: Directed Research
Credits: 1
Eligible students receive credit for serving as research assistants supervised by selected law school faculty members.
LAW 8812: Independent Research
Credits: 2
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member
LAW 8813: Independent Research
Credits: 3
This course is a semester-long independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8814: Independent Research (YR)
This course is the first semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.
LAW 8815: Independent Research (YR)
Credits: 2
This course is the second semester of a yearlong independent research project resulting in a substantial research paper supervised and graded by a selected law school faculty member.